Unaccompanied Spread by Tracy White

Tracy White

Young Adult

Tracy White is a cartoonist and teacher. She believes stories can change the world.

Her current book, Unaccompanied: Stories of Brave Teenagers Seeking Asylum tells the true experiences of brave teens fleeing their home countries to seek asylum in the U.S. Based on extensive interviews Tracy helps us understand why some young people would literally risk their lives to seek safety in the U.S. Each one of them has been backed into a corner where emigration to the U.S. seems like their only hope. 

Unaccompanied was nominated for a Cybil Award and is a YALSA Great Graphic Novel.

Tracy’s first graphic novel, How I Made it to Eighteen: A Mostly True Story, was a Bank  Street Book of the year, a YALSA Great Graphic Novel, and a Texas Maverick Graphic Novel. Her webcomic TRACED was nominated twice for an Ignatz and was a TV series for Oxygen TV.

When not making comics, she’s a mom, cat wrangler, and daily dark chocolate eater who enjoys nature walks even though she lives in a city.

Cartoonist Tracy White, author and illustrator of UNACCOMPANIED and HOW I MADE IT TO EIGHTEEN

What was your favorite book as a child?

My favorite book as a child was Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Siverstien – it’s like a comic in poetry. The words and images together create that beautiful third idea (Scott Mccloud’s term). It’s one of my favorite tools in the comics tool box.

What is your favorite food?

I eat three squares of dark chocolate every day – sometimes four.

Mediums:

Digital

Specialties:

Location:

New York City

Visit Tracy at:

GET IN TOUCH ABOUT TRACY.

Art Process:

I start with words, lots of them on lined paper, writing by hand and skipping every other line. Most of my work is non fiction so there is LOTS or research involved which means: interviews, transcriptions, reading, listening, watching – eventually organizing by color coding then index cards until I get to the WRITING! I always write with a blue ball point pen. I keep adding to my manuscripts to see what is underneath my original idea. I find that if I keep adding rather than editing at first,  ideas will form that were behind the original thoughts and that helps shape the narrative. Then I write a script and start doodling alongside it images that pop into my mind – very rough. Eventually the script moves to the computer. I print it out and carry it around with me for a while jotting down notes – I rewrite, print, repeat. A lot. 

Then it’s the drawing phase. Very loose thumbnails that very slowly become more refined. Somewhere in there I start doing character sketches. I check in with a few trusted folks just to see if what I think I’m communicating is being communicated. I do pencils on paper then I move that all to CSP or to PS. My last book was done in CSP and moved to PS for the typography. I spend many many hours drawing until it feels just right. 

Awards and honors:

Yalsa great graphic novel
Bank street book of the year
Texas Maverik Book list

Forthcoming books:

Published books:

How I Made it to Eighteen, a mostly true story Roaring Brook Press, 2010
Border X , contributor 2021
Draw The Line, contributor 2022
Unaccompanied: Stories of Brave Teenagers Seeking Asylum, Street Noise Books, 2023

Available for School Visits:

I LOVE to speak at schools, libraries, and universities. I am a teacher and have done workshops and discussions for grades 5 through college. Also grownups!

These engrossing workshops can be tailored to your specific needs and are between 60 and 90 minutes long (or short!). I can partner with you to create the perfect custom workshop or discussion for your needs. For anyone interested in non-fiction graphic storytelling. No drawing experience necessary!

Current specific workshops around Unaccompanied are here:

https://www.traced.com/workshops/

Please reach out to me WORKSHOPS@TRACED.COM to schedule a visit. See you soon!


In Search of Superpowers by Briana Lawrence

Briana Lawrence

Young Adult

Briana Lawrence has wanted to be a “WRITTER” since she was nine years old. Her fourth grade class laughed and wondered how one hoped to become a “writer” if they couldn’t even spell the word. 

Years later (okay, like a decade and some change), Briana graduated from Iowa State University and moved to Minneapolis with her partner. Today, she is the Senior Features Editor at Crunchyroll where she works with an amazing team of writers to find ways to talk about how sports anime is good for your mental health (among other topics). 

Briana has quite a few self-published works such as her Black, queer magical girl series magnifiqueNOIR. In 2024 she will be releasing two new books from two different publishers. In Search of Superpowers: A Fantasy Pin World Adventure (Andrew McMeel Publishing) is her very first middle grade series. The Essential Manga Guide (Running Press, 2024) is a collection of essays that talk about the importance of manga and how you can find any kind of story you want within manga. 

Briana lives in St. Paul, Minnesota with her wife and three butthead cats. Here she enjoys exploring Hyrule, waiting for more information on Hades 2, and rewatching SK8 the Infinity for the hundredth time.

Briana Lawrence

What was your favorite book as a child?

I don’t remember the name of it, but I do remember that it was a choose your own adventure style Super Mario Bros. book where you’d get to a certain point in the story, have to make a decision, and turn to the page that correlated with the decision you made. Besides that book, I remember reading a LOT of Sweet Valley High and The Baby-Sitter’s Club.

What is your favorite food?

Baked macaroni and cheese

What do you love to do for fun?

Yell at my TV when a video game gets too hard, lol!

What cool travel spots would you most highly recommend?

Las Vegas for the food and for the random discoveries you can find, like the quirky Omega Mart or the botanical gardens at The Bellagio.

Who or what inspires you the most, and why?

My older brother died when I was 13. Ever since then I find myself wondering what he’d think of me now, so I try and live in a way that he’d be proud of — or at the very least call me a dork about, lol.

Mediums:

GET IN TOUCH ABOUT BRIANA

You also love anime and video games. Do you have any specific memories from those two mediums that have helped you as a writer?

I’ll pick a game one and an anime one for this. I remember watching someone play the very first Legend of Zelda game and being in awe because it really did feel like you were going on an epic quest. I remember watching them travel around, have to find clues and things like that, and it was really cool seeing what kind of stories video games could tell. With anime, I remember watching Sailor Moon and how much it impacted me, because it was the first time I remember seeing an entire group of girls be the heroes of the story. I’d seen teams with girls/women involved, like Power Rangers and X-Men, but Sailor Moon was the first time it was ALL girls. Like… I didn’t know that was an option!

Art Process:

Without fail, there is always at least one cat in the area when I’m writing. Whether I’m in my office or in the living room with my laptop I’m guaranteed to see at least one of our three cats in the area. 

I generally write to music, but something about the early mornings makes it easier to write in silence. When I’m writing a story I outline the whole thing first, from beginning to end, along with character descriptions and key scenes so I have some kind of guide to look back at. Car rides with my wife are very necessary so I can talk about what I’m planning while eating either ice cream or chicken nuggets.

Specialties:

Forthcoming books:

The Essential Manga Guide: 50 Series Every Manga Fan Should Know (Running Press, June 2024)

Gamer Girls: Retro Rhythms (Andrews McMeel, November 2024)

Published books:

In Search of Superpowers: A Fantasy Pin World Adventure (Andrews McMeel Publishing, January 2024)

Location:

St Paul, MN

Visit Briana at:

Awards and honors:

Nothing yet!

Available for School Visits:

Occasionally I’ve done panels/presentations at schools about diversity in writing, but these were at colleges. I’ve also done conventions and events that let me have a table to sell my work. 

I would definitely be up for more school/library visits and events where I could talk about diversity in writing, or in the case of the manga book, the kinds of stories that are available in that medium.


Olivia Li

Young Adult

Olivia Li is a cartoonist, multidisciplinary artist, and organizer based in Queens, NY. She’s particularly interested in telling coming-of-age and self-discovery stories of queer, POC protagonists, and portrayals of lived experiences of mental illness. Her comics dive into this focus through magic, myth, and the lives of urban ambiverts. She has edited two indie comics anthologies and has recently started dipping her toe into small press publishing under the banner of Lenticule Press.

Olivia Li

What was your favorite book as a child?

As a small child I had a collection of Leo Lionni picture books that I read over and over. I love his soft yet bright imagery, his use of different collage and painting techniques for texture, and the fact that all those melancholy stories probably gave me depression haha. As a medium-sized child, it was all Tamora Pierce and other fantasy adventure stories, plus any kind of myth or fairy tale retelling I could find.

What is your favorite food?

It’s a tie between xiao long bao and really good grapes

What do you love to do for fun?

Getting through my daunting piles of books I’ve bought but haven’t read yet, textile crafts (mostly embroidery and cross-stitch), mahjong, cooking and baking, running around New York with pals, pet every cat, accidentally getting caught up in random design projects (right now I am casually trying to design the perfect work backpack for the art/design freelancer who travels a lot and carries a million supplies)

What cool travel spots would you most highly recommend?

The parts of travel I remember most vividly are the ones that spark my visual imagination, landscapes and structures so different from what I’m used to that my mind starts making up stories that could only be set here. My top three so far: 1) the cable car up to Tian Tan Buddha in Hong Kong, 2) the Road to Hana on Maui, and 3) the tiny little side streets in Venice. Also: I love hanging out in graveyards, because I am a spooky ghost.

Who or what inspires you the most, and why?

The stories I always go back to are the ones you find in mythology, fairy tales, folklore. There’s something I really love about the fact that cultures all around the world kept making up the same stories to tell each other. The root of storytelling is human connection, how cool is that! That’s what I’m trying to do, make stories that come from my experiences and see who they connect with.

Art Process:

My illustrations and comics nearly always start life as messy little pencil drawings that are barely legible to other people, so I can figure out compositions without getting too precious. After what I call the “sloppy thumbnails” stage, I move onto digital (in my primary workflow, at least, since it’s better than traditional for my hand and wrist, and offers more flexibility). Here’s where I draw cleaner thumbnails and layouts (and sometimes color-blocking), then pencils and lettering, then inks and colors. For client work, I will show each stage for review and adjustments before moving to the next; I submit several options at the “clean thumbnails” stage if a composition/design needs to be made by the client.

I currently use Clip Studio Paint on my iPad as my primary drawing software, and sometimes Adobe Fresco. I’m proficient in Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Premiere, and After Effects.

GET IN TOUCH ABOUT OLIVIA

Mediums:

Mostly digital these days, sometimes ink on paper

Specialties:

Forthcoming books:

West Middle Mirror (Andrews McMeel, Fall 2026)

Published books:

Location:

Queens, NY

Visit Olivia at:

Awards and honors:

MICE Mini-Grant recipient (2019) for Good Morning, Gorgon!

Available for School Visits:

It’s been a few years, but I’ve taught single- and multiple-week comics workshops for age ranges 6-8 and 8-14, and am open to doing more! These consisted of comic formats and basic story structure, leading up to each participant making their own stapled mini-comic.


Tak Toyoshima

Young Adult

Tak Toyoshima is the creator/illustrator of Secret Asian Man, a comic strip exploring race relations. It became the first nationally syndicated comic (United Features) with an Asian American lead. He is the art director for MICE (Massachusetts Independent Comics Expo) and teaches comics to middle schoolers on the weekends.

Tak has also won awards for cover design, layout, photo illustration, and info-graphics during his 10+ years as a creative director for Boston’s alternative newspaper The Weekly Dig. He advocated for the use of illustration for covers, working with hundreds of local renowned and up-and-coming artists such as Shepard Fairey, James Jean, and Peter Max, to name a few.

Tak Toyoshima

What was your favorite book as a child?

Dr. Slump (series) by Akira Toriyama. As a child I read a lot of comics, both American and Japanese manga. Dr. Slump stands out in my mind for so many reasons. It is hilarious, thoughtful, borderline inappropriate (without being raunchy), features extremely well-designed and interesting characters, but mostly I fell in love with the art style that seemed to flow effortlessly from childish simplicity to technically stunning detail.

Who or what inspires you the most, and why?

I love working with kids. Not necessarily teaching AT them, but learning WITH them.

On Saturdays I teach a comics class for middle school kids to help develop their skills in writing as well as drawing. Their stories always remind me of what is at the core of my love for comics: the challenge of transferring stories in my head to blank pages. It’s important for kids to learn how to communicate and to expose them to comics as a playground where they can develop these skills in an open and non-judgmental way.

Mediums:

pencils, pen and ink, digital, coffee

Specialties:

Awards and honors:

GET IN TOUCH ABOUT TAK

Art Process:

For pure illustration work-for-hire, it’s all about the client. To me the challenge is in finding my voice in the assignment. Usually the end goal is relatively simple. “We need a beer label with these elements. Use green and red.” “We need a spot illustration about the slippery slope of A.I. art. But make it funny.” Countless illustrators and designers can accomplish these goals but what is it that only I can offer? That’s what keeps me up at night.

Now, not all projects are created equal and I am certainly guilty of being less invested in some than others (gotta pay that mortgage!). But at the end of the day if I am putting my name to something I want it to stand alongside the best work. And when it comes to longer-form work like comics series and graphic novels, there are no excuses.

Available for School Visits:

I am currently represented by the American Program Bureau for speaking engagements and have been traveling to present about my comics work since about 2015. Most of my presentations have been at universities (Harvard, MIT, Princeton, Georgetown, Baylor, UNLV, etc.) speaking on my journey in comics talking about Asian representation, the challenges of advocating for a minority voice, and the complexities of race relations in America.

I have presented to younger students as well, from grade school through high school, where I mostly speak of the experience of working in comics and the effort that comes with the “fun” of drawing pictures for a living. Many of these talks include hands-on workshops where kids join in and create comics.

I have also presented at professional conferences for teachers, discussing how comics can be used in school curriculum and how the art form is a powerful tool for students to use for self-expression and critical thinking.

Forthcoming books:

Published books:

The Daily Days (collection of 3 years of nationally syndicated daily comic strips distributed by United Features, 2nd printing 2023)
Make Good Choices (print and online choose-your-own-adventure style book revolving around controversial social justice topics such as abortion, police brutality, critical race theory, gun control, 2023)
Kwok (anti-Asian hate crime fundraiser for local elderly care organization in Boston’s Chinatown, 2021)
RISE: A Pop History of Asian America from the Nineties to Now (Mariner Books, 2022)
Enough About Me written by Richard Lui (Zondervan Books, 2021)
New Frontiers: the Many Worlds of George Takei (SI Universe Media, 2017)
Gwan Anthology (Forward Comix, 2016)
Artists Against Police Brutality (Rosarium Publishing, 2015)
Tomo: Friendship Through Fiction (Stone Bridge Press, 2012)
Out of Sequence: Underrepresented Voices in American Comics (U. of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, 2008)
Secret Identities: the Asian American Superhero Anthology (The New Press, 2009)
East Main Street (New York University Press, 2005)
Attitude 2: the New Subversive Alternative Cartoonists (NBM, 2004)

Location:

Hanover, MA

Visit Tak at:


Jenny Mannis

Young Adult

I am a costume designer turned author-illustrator. With over a decade of experience in professional theater, I have designed at theaters all over the country including The Public Theater, Manhattan Theatre Club, 2nd Stage, and Steppenwolf. I hold an MFA from the Yale School of Drama and am a member of Kids Comics Unite, SCBWI, and the Authors’ Guild.

As a costume designer, I practice visual storytelling, transforming the written words of a play into images. My writing and illustration are heavily influenced by character design, color story, historical research, and imaginative world building. My time in theater has also led me to value compelling dialogue, twisty plots and brisk pacing.

When I’m not planning and researching the next two books in the Escape Artist series, I can be found trying to keep up with my two teens and two rescue dogs and dodging the monsters that live in the basement.

Jenny Mannis

What was your favorite book as a child?

All of them? I read to escape, so I was going for quantity over quality. But anything where a fantasy or alternate world existed in tandem with ours was my jam: The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe, Alice in Wonderland, Grimm’s fairy tales, the Choose Your Own Adventure books, Maurice Sendak, Roald Dahl (deep cut: Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator), Edward Gorey, Charles Addams comics, The X-Men. I read Stephen King’s It on the eighth-grade ski trip and that book changed me.

Mediums:

Pencil and paper for roughs and doodles. Dip pen and ink wash if I’m feeling fancy. Nothing beats the hand feel of graphite and real ink but I’m in love with Photoshop for the infinite possibilities and speed. I like messiness and rough edges, so I use a chunky, jittery ink brush for inking and loose watercolor, pastel and marker brushes for texture. I draw my own panel borders and speech balloons. Overall, I’m trying for a quick, scribbly, hands-on feeling.

GET IN TOUCH ABOUT JENNY

Art Process:

I always start from research. A mysterious building, 1950s horror comics, a news clipping – anything that sparks my fancy. I’ll be a magpie for a while and gather ideas and images from books, movies or the internet. I let the new stuff knock around for a while until I’ve got a premise or a question, a group of characters, a visual vibe, a color scheme, an idea that spooks me.

My creativity comes from the process of collection and whatever gets cooked up in the basement of my subconscious – the rest is iteration. I use scene cards to track plot points, character development, and my favorite research images. I’ll make a detailed outline and, once I know the major beats and the characters’ journey, I fill in the dialogue and paneling. I pull images and color story from my research and lay in the art stepwise. This orderly process comes from my practice as a theater designer: a highly structured system of organization and routine that sets the conditions for creativity. Stephen King calls his muse a “basement guy.” The muse does his thing down below while you put the time in at your desk: just like in theater where the designers and crew work behind the scenes so the magic can happen on stage.

What is your favorite food?

Popcorn jellybeans, black licorice, Necco Wafers, candy corn, Smarties: I love an underdog!

Specialties:

Forthcoming books:

Published books:

Location:

Chicago, IL

Visit Jenny at:

Awards and honors:

Available for School Visits:


Jonathan St. Amant

Young Adult

My name’s Jon, and I like to draw wizards, monsters, derpy chubs, pinups, and ninjas. By day I’m a middle school art teacher, and by night I’m a dad/graphic novelist. I’m also an amatuer beekeeper and hobby aquarist. I’m inspired by video game RPGs, fantasy movies and novels, science fiction and outer space, manga and anime, my students, and the ills of society.

After receiving my BFA in Drawing and Painting and Art Credential from Long Beach State, I moved away from the fine art world and dove headfirst into the warm and supportive communities of cartoons, comics, and kid lit. I love to consume and create unconventional stories with relatable themes, but my absolute favorite thing is character design.
I live in Southern California with my wife (who collaborates with me on stories), my two boys, two cats, a bunch of fish, and bees.

What do you love to do for fun?

I love hiking, surfing, playing video games (especially RPGs), trying different foods, traveling, gardening, taking care of my aquarium, evangelizing about bees, collecting comics and graphic novels, and of course reading them. 

What is your favorite book as a child?

One of my favorite books as a child was Richard Scarry’s What do People do All Day? I loved finding all the details in the backgrounds. If you were savvy, you could even find Lowly Worm.

Mediums:

Specialties:

GET IN TOUCH ABOUT JONATHAN

Art Process:

Typically, I like to sketch out an idea in my sketchbook first. For references, I’ll use Google, my own photos, or Pinterest. When I’m happy with my sketch or layout, I’ll take a photo of it and import it into either Procreate or Clip Studio. From there, I’ll ink over the sketch on a seperate layer with my favorite digital brush (for Procreate it’s Maxpack’s MaxU Sable Inker Soft). After that, I add colors and other effects on different layers.

Published books:

Critical Thinking: A Shepherd’s Guide to Tending Sheep, Kendall Hunt, 2000

Are You Mad? A Guide for Developmental Writers, Kendall Hunt, 2001

What a Trip, Kendall Hunt, 2005

Location:

Visit Jonathan at:

Awards and honors:

Teacher of the Year, 2011
Winner of the KCU logo/mascot contest 2021

Available for School Visits:

I visit the same school every day (I teach middle school art), but I am also willing to visit other schools as long as I can use a sick day here and there. I like to do step-by-step draw-alongs.


Turtleboat

Young Adult

Turtleboat is a comic book artist and illustrator based in NYC. He works primarily with pen and ink, and colors either digitally or with watercolor. His clients include Okayplayer.com, Random House, and VOX Media. 

In his free time he watches highlights of PRIDE FC and K1 Championships, or collects reference photos from Pinterest and photo books. He also has a grey cat named Kato.

What was your favorite book as a child?

Favorite comic book growing up was definitely Dragon Ball by Akira Toriyama.

What is your favorite food?

Favorite food is Korean braised beef stew made by my mom.

Specialties:

GET IN TOUCH ABOUT TURTLEBOAT

Art Process:

I start off with loose pencil sketches. After that, I spend a good chunk of time finding the correct reference materials. If I can’t find them, I pose for them myself (LOL).

Once the pencils are roughly in place, I utilize a lightbox to ink with a combination of nib pen, microns and brush. I scan the finished inks, and decide to either color traditionally with watercolor, or digitally with Photoshop. Once the back and neck aches start creeping in, I step away and stretch or workout a little bit. Then, back to the drawing!

Published books:

Awkwafina’s NYC 2015 – illustrator, sketch
Pankronicles: Early History of MMA – illustrator for Youtube series under Bloody Elbow, VOX Media

Mediums:

Location:

Visit Turtleboat at:

Available for School Visits:

I’ve spoken at a panel for comics creators at the Queens Book Festival, as well as at a program for high school students at the New School. I enjoy presenting about the craft of comics

Awards and honors:

Silent Manga Audition, Coamix – SMA5, Award Nominee
Silent Manga Audition – SMA4, Award Nominee


Rae Crawford

Young Adult

Rae Crawford is an illustrator, author, and comic artist from the most mysterious regions of the Chicagoland suburbs. She is the creator of the webcomic, I’m Broken, Send Help. When she graduated from Pratt Institute with a BFA in Communication Design, she became a designer by day and an illustrator by night. She loves cartoons, comics, puns, cooking and working on fanzines. Rae currently lives in NYC with her partner, her iPad and a few assorted stuffed animals and plants.

Where do I go for inspiration?

When I’m feeling low on inspiration, I love to watch animated cartoons and movies of all genres and varieties. I browse Instagram where I follow amazing artists and creatives who are always doing something new and exciting. Sometimes, I’ll grab graphic novels from my bookshelf and spend all day soaking in them. But one of my favorite ways to get inspired is to converse with people I find really interesting and insightful. I believe your own perspective can only take you so far.

What is your favorite food?

“There is no aspect, no facet, no moment of life that can’t be improved with pizza.” – Daria

My favorite topping combos are pepperoni & mushroom and just sausage. Fruit does not belong on pizza. Looking at you, pineapples. I have lived in both Chicago and New York. Vito & Nick’s Pizzeria in Chicago has the best thin-crust pizza I’ve ever tasted. But I have a lot of love for my local NY joint. My preference is thin-crust but don’t sleep on the deep dish from Pequod’s (Chicago). I’d prefer my local joint to any fast food place but if necessary, give me Domino’s. Query me for additional pizza-related opinions, quotes and recommendations.

GET IN TOUCH ABOUT RAE

Art Process:

Before anything else, I break the project up in a to-do list and set goals. I invest as much time, love and care into brainstorming, outlining, and conceptualizing as I can because it is the foundation of the rest of the project. I usually conceptualize ideas with my laptop, ipad, sketchbook and notepad on hand because I never know where my ideas will be best articulated. I usually draw thumbnails and write dialogue side by side. Once the groundwork is solid, I begin sketching.

Sometimes I start on paper but more likely, I will start in Procreate. My sketches start pretty rough but it helps me plan out composition and iron out my thoughts with visuals. Then I do a couple rounds of refining my sketch until I’m happy with how the elements are harmonizing. The sketches I deliver are typically a solid reflection of the final product. Once I get approval, I do a final inking stage and then I spend a day or two agonizing over the color and texture. I work almost exclusively in Procreate now but I will export my finals into photoshop to adjust colors. As a designer myself, if I’m not delivering flat images, I will go in and label my layers accordingly.

Awards and honors:

Adobe Design Achievement & MAX Awards (2014, 2017)


Rivkah LaFille

Young Adult

Rivkah LaFille (pronounced “lah-fee”) is a children’s illustrator, writer, designer and graphic novelist living in Austin, TX. Her graphic novel series, Steady Beat, was nominated to the American Library Association’s Great Graphic Novels for Teens list. She was nominated as a Lulu of the Year by Friends of Lulu for her work in promoting women in comics, and she won the Austin SCBWI Portfolio Showcase Award, presided over by Caldecott winner and New York Times bestselling author, Dan Santat.

In the early 2000s, she was the publisher and art director of a small literary publishing house, Rabid Press. Her “eureka!” moment happened when one day she woke up and realized she was going to make comics for the rest of her life instead. She did. She does. And she hasn’t looked back since.

Currently, she is illustrating a graphic novel with First Second, another with Candlewick, teaching comics-making classes, and making magic!

What was your favorite book as a child?

Miss Rumphius is STILL one of my favorites. It’s all about leaving the world a better place than we found it, which is basically my life motto.

What do you love to do for fun?

Gardening is my Happy Place. There is something so satisfying in taking care of a plant from seed, watering it, tending it, and watching it turn into a fruit or vegetable that you can eat. But watching the cycles of nature reminds me of the cycles within my own life: that even as the world grows and blooms and dies, new life is born out of it once again.

Mediums:

Specialties:

GET IN TOUCH ABOUT RIVKAH

Art Process:

My art process is a balance between logical problem-solving and creative intuition. I begin by thinking about the project as a whole: what is the tone, the technique, the style that would best suit this project? What is its age range? What’s the timeline? Every project has different demands, and before I start drawing, I think of what those demands are and how to answer them.

The rest, however, is largely a matter of doing and refining. Whether I’m creating fast and loose storyboards or finely detailed picture books, working in digital or analog mediums, the end result is an editorial style that refines itself with every step until it becomes exactly what the project needs: something that speaks loudly and clearly to my audience!

Published books:

STEADY BEAT v1 – Tokyopop – 2005 (YA LGBTQ+ graphic novel)
STEADY BEAT v2 – Tokyopop – 2007 (YA LGBTQ+ graphic novel)
MANGAKA AMERICA – HarperCollins – 2007 (tutorial book)
CREATIVE WRITING WITH MISS MARY MAC – First Second – date TBD (nonfiction graphic novel)

Location:

Visit Rivkah at:

Available for School Visits:

I love talking to (and with) students! My talks range from discussing my comics-making process to more inspirational-type discussions about finding your path in life and how to not be afraid of making mistakes…and to learn and grown from them! I specialize in talking to teens and tweens, but also adults wanting to make graphic novels for ages babies to teens.

Awards and honors:

Nominated to the YALSA GREAT GRAPHIC NOVELS for TEENS List in 2007
Friends of Lulu Award 2007 – Nominee
Winner of the 2019 SCBWI Portfolio Showcase Award (and runner up previous two years) presided over by Caldecott Winner Dan Santat


Joshua Smeaton

Young Adult

Joshua Smeaton was born on his birthday.

When he was a teenager, Josh jabbed a friend in the finger with a Rapid-O-Graph pen. The friend still has the single dot permanently etched on his skin. Josh is still waiting to hear from top ink recruiters in the tattoo industry.

Josh’s parents required him to become an Eagle Scout before he could get his driver’s license. He got his license the day he turned sixteen and was shortly after pulled over by the police for looking too young to drive. Josh then nearly caused an accident pulling back onto the road.

Josh won a Xeric award once. That was a good day. The Xeric grant was created by Peter Laird, one of the guys who created The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Josh’s favorite ninja turtle is Donatello. He used to own a first printing of issue 4 of the original comic book series. 

Bill Murray once ate Josh’s French fries at an In-N-Out Burger. They talked about music and driving across the country. They have not kept in touch.

Josh wanted to name his son Taylor Rex so he could call him T-Rex for short. His wife vetoed this.

What was your favorite book as a child?

I loved The Great Brain series of books by John D. Fitzgerald. In 7th grade, I won a contest to turn your favorite book into a poster using The Great Brain.

Favorite Comic Book, hands down, was Sergio Aragonés’ Groo The Wanderer. It was my biggest influence in wanting to draw comics. 

What is your favorite food?

Chocolate chip cookies.

Mediums:

Published books:

Haunted – Self published 2009

GET IN TOUCH ABOUT JOSHUA

Art Process:

I’ll do some sketching/doodling in my sketchbook or cheap spiral notebooks. (I have tons.) Mostly just loose unfinished things in pencil or ballpoint pen. I use my good friends Google and Pinterest to find reference or inspiration on the subject. I’ll grab a bunch of images and put them all in a program called Pure Ref. It allows me to view all the images in one place, zooming in or out. 

For the final work, I draw on my computer with my tablet. I primarily draw in Clip Studio Paint. Sometimes I’ll color in CSP but more often I still use Photoshop. 

Specialties:

Location:

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Available for School Visits:

Make Your Own Graphic Novel

I show slides of my own process, from how I get my ideas and the steps of developing them, to how I turn pictures into words and ultimately, a finished graphic novel or comic book. We’ll then segue into creating, where I do live sketching and the students will follow along creating and drawing their own ideas. 

Awards and honors:

Xeric.